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Your most common questions about no-fault divorce answered

A few months ago, it was announced that the UK would be introducing legislation that would remove fault from the divorce process. In other words, when filing for a divorce, it will no longer be necessary for the filing party (the Petitioner) to blame the Respondent (the spouse not making the application) by stating tha...

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Can expats get an online divorce?

In an increasingly globalised world, more and more people than ever now live in their non-native countries. As a result, we’re regularly contacted by expats enquiring about whether an English or Welsh court will be able to grant them a divorce. Jurisdiction (a term used to describe when an authority can deal w...

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Should I get consent before filing for divorce?

When both parties consent to a divorce, the process is much easier. Whilst there are instances where consent is vital, and it is therefore strongly recommend that it is sought before filing, there are also those where obtaining consent before starting the divorce process is, whilst still advisable, far from absolutely...

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How you can divorce your spouse without them knowing

Under certain circumstances, one spouse can divorce their husband/wife without them knowing. If spouses are estranged, unaware of where each other live and one attempts to find the other’s address but is unsuccessful following a comprehensive search, they may be allowed to end their marriage without the other par...

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How much does an online divorce cost?

Quickie Divorce offer several packages ranging in price from £37 to £167. In addition, a filing fee of £550 is payable to the courts, though you could have this reduced or even waived entirely. You can find out if you can get help with the court fee for a divorce here. Each of our packages include...

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What will I have to do to get a divorce?

Have you been looking into the divorce process in the UK? If you have, you’ll certainly have encountered the terms ‘Petitioner’ and ‘Respondent’. These terms are used to describe the roles each spouse will play throughout their divorce as it progresses through the courts – but how ar...

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Should you wait for no-fault divorce before filing?

It’s official: after years of cajoling, hinting and, well… harassment from those working within the field of family law, the government has relented, and no-fault divorce will soon be available within the UK. Following this announcement, Quickie Divorce have been inundated with calls from people wanting...

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How to change your name after a divorce

Once a divorce has been finalised, many people want to revert back to their maiden name as soon as possible. In spite of this, a surprisingly large number of people keep their married name. Not because they want to, but because they don’t know what they’ll need to do in order to officially revert back to th...

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After a couple divorce, who should pay the mortgage?

It’s more than likely your biggest asset so, if you and your spouse are separating or divorcing, you’re probably concerned about what’s going to happen to your home. During what is already a very difficult period, such concerns can bring about discomfort and anxiety. In fact, our team are contacted by...

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When a couple divorce, who keeps the dog?

To some, the question ‘who gets custody of the dog after a divorce?’ will be deeply trivial; the divisions of assets such as property, savings and pensions are, they’d argue, key to a settlement and everything else is superfluous. To others, the destination of the family pet is more important than any...

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Common problems with DIY divorce

When we need something done – whether it be putting up some shelves, a spot of gardening, touching up scuffed walls or anything else – we can always save money by doing it ourselves. Sometimes, this makes sense. We can all mow our lawn, for example. At other times, though, trying to get something done witho...

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Divorce, five-year separation and how it works

Living separately for a period of more than five years is one of five grounds for divorce. It can therefore be used to prove that a marriage has broken down and that there is no reasonable chance of the couple in question reconciling. Unlike two-year separation, divorces citing five-year separation do not require th...

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